Where Are You Coming From?

Beautiful.

DoubleU = W

Where are you coming from?

Has life been a struggle,

or have you lived atop the world?

Is your health of no concern,

or do you fight every step?

Has love come easily for you,

or have you been abandoned?

Are your familial ties strong,

or does dysfunction mark your past?

Your life, your journey brought you here.

I ask again –

Where are you coming from?

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Baring the Female Breasts: Beyond Objectification

Stories From the Belly

There is so much more to a woman’s relationship to her breasts than meets the naked eye. In this post, I am thrilled to have two of my favorite bloggers, KS of Kosher Adobo and Jennifer Berney of Goodnight Already, joining me as we pay homage to this most famous of feminine body parts.

http://tinyurl.com/ocvkvkc Two Tahitian Women by Paul Gauguin http://tinyurl.com/ocvkvkc
Two Tahitian Women by Paul Gauguin

CHERRY

I am a junior in boarding school. Behind me is a “Save Sex” poster and a perfume ad: “Femme Fatale: When the female of the species is more dangerous than the male.” It’s the night before the first day of school. I am tugging on the neck of my shirt, admiring my bra strap. Every bra I owned just a year before was white or beige, looking more like bandages for my then AA breasts. But this 36B brassiere, red and lined with lace, which I bought…

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Selma, mighty Selma (2014)

Tananarive Due Writes

“People are trapped in history, and history is trapped in them.”  –James Baldwin

la_ca_1021_selma David Oyelowo as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Selma.

I was raised by two civil rights activists – attorney John Due and the late Patricia Stephens Due—so stories of Martin Luther King, Jr. were common in my house. My mother first met Dr. King at a CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) workshop in Miami in 1959. My aunt, Priscilla Stephens Kruize, who attended with her, is an activist. Our godparents were activists, black and white.

Even without an official holiday, my sisters and I got to skip school every January 15 for annual birthday celebrations that brought neighbors, activists and politicians to our home to reflect on Dr. King and the legacy of The Movement. We held hands, listened to Dr. King’s speeches, and sang “We Shall Overcome.” As an adult, I co-authored a civil rights…

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A Good Man Is Hard To Find, Jefferson’s Very Small Batch Bourbon, And Grits.

Empires, Cannibals, and Magic Fish Bones

It’s late, cold and I’m drinking Jefferson’s Kentucky Bourbon Very Small Batch.  Much spice and vanilla on the nose with citrus notes everywhere–green apples and rum in there as well.  Taste?  Very clean, refreshing, slightly sour with red-hot candy, anise, a bit of lemon, bit of grass, and cookie dough.

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A roll of nectar in the mouth, head tilts back, eyes close and the mind wanders to the past.  In this case, Flannery O’Connor’s insightful diagnosis of memory in her classic short story A Good Man Is Hard To Find.  Over the years, I’ve read and re-read this story, assigned it in various classes, and discussed with students its many aspects of the absurd, grotesque and violent.  The story also contemplates our relationship to memories and what might happen when the past shapes the present.  The following scene occurs halfway through the tale, and marks a turning point…

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